Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

Transitioning Your Skincare for Summer

Anyone else have skin that goes a little crazy when the warmer months roll in? You are not alone. Here in North Carolina, the humidity gets out of control around this time and I basically go from having dry, wintry skin to skin that is constantly sweaty and damp. I've learned a few tricks for switching up my cleansing routine and wanted to share them with you ...

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Anyone else have skin that goes a little crazy when the warmer months roll in? You are not alone. Here in North Carolina, the humidity gets out of control around this time and I basically go from having dry, wintry skin to skin that is constantly sweaty and damp. I've learned a few tricks for switching up my cleansing routine and wanted to share them with you ...

More

Anyone else have skin that goes a little crazy when the warmer months roll in? You are not alone. Here in North Carolina, the humidity gets out of control around this time and I basically go from having dry, wintry skin to skin that is constantly sweaty and damp. I've learned a few tricks for switching up my cleansing routine and wanted to share them with you:

1. Switch up your cleansing oil: In the winter months I use the dry/mature version of the Some Call Me Crunchy Cleansing Oil. When the warmer months begin, I switch to the normal/combo version. The dry/mature blend has more olive oil than the normal/combo and can be a little too heavy in the summer (unless your skin is naturally super dry). If you're using the normal/combo in the winter you can try switching to the oily/acne prone for the summer. 

2. Only use your serum once a day: In the winter, I apply our oil based serum after cleansing morning and night. In the spring/summer, I ONLY apply it after cleansing at night because it takes my skin longer to absorb the oils. Also, be sure that you are still using some sort of moisturizer during the warmer months. It can be tempting to skip it because you are sweating so much and your face doesn't feel as dry. You most definitely still want to use a moisturizer so that your body isn't triggered to produce more sebum (which is what clogs your pores). At night I use our body butter as an overnight moisturizer and in the morning I use this one by Beautycounter*. 

3. Toner, toner, toner: Make sure you are using a toner. Some Call Me Crunchy Complexion Mists (we now have two scents: lavender + rose and calendula + frankincense) are the perfect way to tone your skin year round. They help balance out oil production which is what you need to prevent acne and wrinkles. 

 

Have more questions about switching up your routine for the summer? Feel free to email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

*If you are interested in Beautycounter products, I am a consultant and would be glad to help. I use their makeup, shampoo/conditioner, and the moisturizer listed above. You can see all that they offer here: https://www.beautycounter.com/eriennejones. 

 


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