Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle

7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle

Is it time to call it quits with your toddler’s night-time drinking habits? Follow these tips for a smooth transition. By Kim Bell

The post 7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle appeared first on Living and Loving.


7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle

Is it time to call it quits with your toddler’s night-time drinking habits? Follow these tips for a smooth transition. By Kim Bell

The post 7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle appeared first on Living and Loving.

7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle

It’s time for bed, your toddler cuddles down, her bottle in hand. She sucks hard as her eyes start to droop. She is soon asleep, her bottle fiercely clutched under her arm, a drool of milk leaking out the corner of her relaxed mouth. But, if you try to remove that bottle, those closed eyes will open, an accusing look on her face as she shoves the bottle back in and sucks heartily.

ALSO SEE: How to wean your toddler off transitional objects like his blankie and dummy

Why a bedtime bottle isn’t a good idea

Between the ages of six and nine months, the bedtime bottle moves from being a necessity to a comfort says The American Academy of Pediatrics.

And while you may think this is a harmless comfort and part of your bedtime routine, the experts reveal that the opposite is true. Firstly, the longer you offer this bottle at bedtime, the more your toddler becomes attached – she soon won’t be able to fall asleep without it.

Secondly, once your baby’s teeth start to come through, falling asleep with a bottle can lead to tooth issues later on. The milk tends to pool in your baby’s mouth while she is sleeping and the natural sugars will target your baby’s new teeth.

Research shows that toddlers who continue to bottle feed past 15 months take in more than the recommended amount of milk required on a daily basis, which can increase your child’s risk of obesity, constipation and iron deficiency. In fact, the recommended intake for toddlers aged two to three is two cups, or around 500ml, of milk per day.

The American Academy of Pediatrics further recommends that you should ideally aim to wean your baby off her night-time bottle by 12 months.

ALSO SEE: 11 reasons for toddler night waking, PLUS tips to help your toddler fall asleep on his own again

Try these tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle:

  • Change up the night-time routine. This may seem counterproductive − especially as you have just gotten her into a good sleep routine, but this will be of benefit in the long run. Firstly, start by introducing a sippy cup with a smaller amount of milk and offer this to your toddler after her dinner. This can be followed by brushing of teeth and a bedtime ritual, like reading a story.

ALSO SEE: 9 fun bedtime games for toddlers

  • If she is slightly older, have her help choose her new cup. Alternatively, have two cups on offer and let her choose which one she would prefer to have that night.
  • Offer another comfort object, like a favourite stuffed toy or soft blanket at bedtime instead of her bottle.
  • Provide loads of encouragement. Your toddler may find this to be a traumatic time as she identifies her bottle with being able to fall asleep. Words of encouragement and praise and lauding her being a “big girl” will be helpful.
  • Fake it. Watering down her milk over several nights may encourage her to decide that night-time drink isn’t as desirable as she thought. This can be done in conjunction with introducing the sippy cup.
  • Choose your fights. If your toddler is going through a stressful time, like getting to know a new caregiver, starting daycare or school, or any other major changes it’s probably not the best time to wean.
  • Your toddler’s milk intake could affect her eating habits, as toddlers can be picky creatures when it comes to eating. Removing this bottle can help. As long as she is reaching her milestones, growing, pooing and weeing regularly, she will be fine.

The post 7 tips to wean your toddler off her bedtime bottle appeared first on Living and Loving.


Read full article on Trusted advice from pregnancy to preschool