Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

5 fertility myths debunked

5 fertility myths busted

Will lying with your legs up really work? Should you be gulping down cough syrup? Is one position the best? We separate fact from fiction. By Kim Bell

The post 5 fertility myths debunked appeared first on Living and Loving.


5 fertility myths busted

Will lying with your legs up really work? Should you be gulping down cough syrup? Is one position the best? We separate fact from fiction. By Kim Bell

The post 5 fertility myths debunked appeared first on Living and Loving.

5 fertility myths busted

They say that fact is stranger than fiction, but when it comes to baby-making, there are some weird and wonderful beliefs. While some may be fun and others just plain weird, here’s what you need to know.

ALSO SEE: 10 infertility myths busted

Myth: You need to orgasm to conceive

Of course, this is always a plus – but it’s not a must. When you orgasm, your uterus contracts, which can help propel those feisty sperm towards their destination. However, they are pretty smart in finding their own way so, if you don’t organism, it doesn’t mean you won’t fall pregnant. A study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has found that a chemical is released with the egg at ovulation that attracts sperm.

Myth: Stick your legs in the air for 20 minutes after sex

All you truly achieve with this is sore legs. Logic says that by sticking your legs in the air, your pelvis is tipped, and gravity will prevail. However, your partner’s sperm are chemically programmed to travel straight towards the first egg they can find. Science reveals the average male will produce around 525 billion sperm cells over a lifetime, shedding at least one billion per month (don’t ask). A healthy man can release between 40 million and 1.2 billion sperm cells in a single ejaculation.

Myth: You need to have sex missionary style to conceive

There is no truth to this one. Both anecdotal and science-based evidence support trying a few positions, the only trick is to ensure deep penetration. So go wild, and have some fun.

Myth: Cough syrup will boost your chances of pregnancy

This nasty little myth has been lurking around since the 1980s. The theory was that one of the common ingredients in cough syrup is guaifenesin, which a 1982 study reported was a fertility booster as it could potentially thin the mucus in your cervix. However, this is not a safe or effective way to boost your pregnancy chances.

Myth: You can’t fall pregnant while breastfeeding

There is some truth to this myth, but it’s no fail-safe. According to lactation experts, the Lactation Amenorrhea Method can be a natural, short-term birth control since the hormones released during breastfeeding interrupt your normal ovulation cycle. However, this is only considered to be 98% effective if the following criteria are at play: your baby is younger than six months old, your monthly periods have not returned, your baby is exclusively breastfed and is feeding every four hours, and there is no more than one six-hour stretch between feeds in a 24-hour period.

The post 5 fertility myths debunked appeared first on Living and Loving.


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