Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

How (and why) to clean your baby’s tongue

How and why to clean your baby's tongue

Everything you need to know about keeping your baby’s mouth clean. By Lisa Witepski

The post How (and why) to clean your baby’s tongue appeared first on Living and Loving.


How and why to clean your baby's tongue

Everything you need to know about keeping your baby’s mouth clean. By Lisa Witepski

The post How (and why) to clean your baby’s tongue appeared first on Living and Loving.

How and why to clean your baby's tongue

If you thought oral hygiene was something you only had to worry about when those first little teeth appear, think again. Starting early (in fact, the earlier, the better) ensures good general health − especially as, with no immune system to speak of, your baby is susceptible to bacteria-causing oral thrush and other infections. The teeth (when they come) and gums may also be affected if you don’t keep things clean in the meantime since pieces of food can accumulate. There’s very little in that tiny mouth to brush, so you’ll have to focus on your baby’s tongue.

ALSO SEE: 9 common baby teeth care questions answered

Keep your hands clean

There’s no room for a toothbrush in there, so you’ll have to use your hands. By now, you’re used to the hand cleaning that needs to take place pretty much all the time when you have a newborn, and tooth (or rather tongue) brushing is no different.

Get ready

Although you can buy purpose-made tongue brushes, you can do the job just as well with a piece of gauze. Simply wrap it around your index finger and dip it in warm water, testing first to make sure it’s not hot enough to burn your baby’s mouth.

Get brushing

This is the hard part. After all, babies don’t particularly enjoy being handled – as soon as you’ve tried to dress one in a babygro, you’ll realise that it’s like trying to stuff a dancing octopus inside a sack – and they’re particularly tetchy about having their little mouths opened against their will. Try to find a hold that’s comfortable for you both. Most moms recommend cradling the baby in one arm so you’re free to brush with the other. This gives her a sense of security. Try do something that will elicit a smile so you gain easy access. Otherwise, pull down her lower lip then wipe the lips gently in small circles, moving onto the tongue, the inner cheeks and the roof of the mouth. Be sure to do the entire mouth after every meal. You can also use the time to check for a white coating on the tongue; a sign of oral thrush.

ALSO SEE: Dealing with oral thrush

Keep it up

Tongue brushing is an important part of oral hygiene at any age, so remember to include it even after those first chompers have arrived. Use a soft toothbrush to gently sweep the tongue and gums along with the teeth.

The post How (and why) to clean your baby’s tongue appeared first on Living and Loving.


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