Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success

6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success

Planning a fishing trip with the family? Keep these handy tips in mind when planning your adventure.

The post 6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success appeared first on Living and Loving.


6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success

Planning a fishing trip with the family? Keep these handy tips in mind when planning your adventure.

The post 6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success appeared first on Living and Loving.

6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success

Family fishing trips have been around for generations. It’s one of those classic bonding opportunities, thanks to a combination of uninterrupted quality time with your child, days spent in nature, and participating in an activity together.

ALSO SEE: 6 fun nature activities for kids in South Africa

If you like the idea of going on a family fishing trip, here are six things to help you plan your expedition:  

The sooner they start, the better

While it’s more challenging taking small children on a fishing trip, the fact is that the younger your child starts fishing, the more likely they are to develop a love for it and become passionate about it as they get older. If you want to take your four-year-old with you, though, you’ll need to adjust your expectations of the type of fishing you’ll do, where you’ll go and how long you’ll be out for. Younger kids mean shorter trips to nearby locations. If your kids are slightly older, you can start to plan longer, more ambitious expeditions.

Adjust your expectations

Taking your child on a fishing trip means far less fishing than if you were on your own or with other fishing friends. For starters, you’re dealing with hooks and delicate equipment, which require supervision from you. Then there’s also the shorter attention span: youngsters tend to be less patient than adults, so this may mean more frequent, shorter trips out onto the water than one long four-hour stint. If you prepare yourself for this though, you can still have an enjoyable trip, where you place importance on the experience of fishing with your child rather than simply what you catch.

Decide when to go

The time of year you’ll go and where you’ll go will depend on a variety of factors – how long it takes to get there (and the logistics and cost involved), school holidays, and when the right season is to fish. You’ll also need to consider weather conditions when you go – if you’re fishing at sea, for example, you’ll need to be especially careful that you’re not going out into dangerous conditions.

Think carefully about your destination. In Southern Africa, we’re spoilt for choice when it comes to amazing fishing destinations, and the type of fishing you’ll do will obviously influence where you go. For example, Dullstroom in Mpumalanga, Du Toitskloof in the Western Cape and the KwaZulu Natal Midlands are all excellent locations for fly fishing.

If you want to add an extra dimension to your trip, something like tiger fishing on the Chobe River means you can combine a water safari experience with a fishing trip. The type of fishing you think your child is capable of will also influence where you go: a younger child, for example, would be more suited to catching smaller fish using simple bait like earthworms, whereas an older child may be able to handle the more physical demands of tiger fishing in a more challenging environment.

What gear will you bring?

Just like you’d buy junior golf clubs or tennis rackets for your children, invest in fishing rods and equipment that are specifically designed for kids (with lighter, shorter rods and smaller hooks, for example). You may be a gear junkie as an experienced fisherman, but your child will need the basics – after all, it’s more about the excitement of the activity than how fancy the equipment is. If you’re flying to your destination, only take what you really need. Many lodges have fishing equipment available for you to use, which means you can pack light.

Will you have a guide?

At places like Ichingo Chobe River Lodge (part of the Zambezi Queen Collection) on the Chobe River in Botswana, fishing guides are available to help you make the most of your fishing trip. If you’re with your children, guides can be hugely helpful in teaching them fishing techniques, teaching them more about the area they’re fishing in, as well as acting as an extra pair of eyes to supervise them while you’re on the boat.

Taking your child on a fishing trip can be an amazing way to discover a new place, teach your child a new skill and spend quality time with them without the distractions of everyday modern life. Some careful planning and adjusting your expectations are the key ingredients to creating a family fishing trip that’s really enjoyable – and that can form part of your family traditions, creating memories for years to come.

The post 6 tips to make your family fishing trip a success appeared first on Living and Loving.


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