Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick

Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick

Sick, irritable and miserable? Here’s how to cope. By Kim Bell

The post Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick appeared first on Living and Loving.


Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick

Sick, irritable and miserable? Here’s how to cope. By Kim Bell

The post Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick appeared first on Living and Loving.

Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick

Are you part of the one third of South Africans who have been struggling with coughs and sniffles this year? According to pharmaceutical company Pharma Dynamics, which polled 1 837 South Africans, aged 18 and older, only 9% of those surveyed escaped colds completely. The stats reveal that 38% caught only one cold, 32% got it twice, 13% three times and 8% a staggering four times. And, if your baby or toddler is at daycare, you can expect him to come home with between eight and 12 colds or infections within the first year – all of which results in a toxic germ dump for you. Of course, as a parent, it’s not like you can simply curl up and give into your cold – or can you?

ALSO SEE: Boost your child’s immunity

As professional counsellor and co-founder of babyproofedparents.com Kirsten Brunner explains, “For most moms I know, kicking up their feet and resting is a near impossibility. There are kids who need to be fed, bathed and bedded. Life doesn’t’ stop because mom or dad isn’t feeling well.” However, she says the best thing you can do for your family is take the time and get yourself well. “Throw your ‘perfect parent’ hat out the window,” she shares. “Perhaps you usually limit your kids to one hour of screen time a day, or you make it a practice to get your baby out for a walk in the fresh air every afternoon. You probably have wonderful routines that make you the great parent you are, but forget about all that. Don’t worry about the TV being on all day or a microwave meal being served for dinner. Your number one priority should be resting and getting well.”

Here are some sanity-saving parenting tips:

Keep your germs to yourself.

The only thing worse than parenting when you are not feeling well, is parenting when you and your baby or toddler are sick. The best way to avoid sharing your germs? Wash your hands often and avoid close contact (as much as possible). This may seem counterintuitive as you are probably your child’s primary caregiver, but by avoiding cup sharing or letting your partner handle bath time and food preparation can help, suggests Kirsten. And, in most cases, you should be able to continue breastfeeding, as this is one of the best things to help boost your baby’s immunity (but make sure to check with your doctor, particularly if you are taking any medication).

ALSO SEE: 6 ways to get your child back on track after an illness

Embrace your inner sloth.

Try rest as much as possible (now is the time to truly try that piece of advice: sleep when your baby sleeps). Don’t worry if things slip, the washing isn’t done, or the house isn’t as tidy as you would like it to be. Rather focus on getting yourself well so you can take care of your brood. If that means allowing your children to watch a little more TV than you usually would, or play on your phone or iPad – so be it.

Embrace horizontal parenting.

Now is the time to lug out those picture books or toys that you have hidden away for a “rainy day”. A cardboard box makes for great fun (and also encourages imagination and creativity). If you child is 18 months to two years or older, you can have her “nurse” or “mother” you. She can put a blanket on you, “read” or sing to you. Alternatively, set her small tasks, like running and touching the door or fetching objects from around the house, like plastic cup, a pair of dad’s socks, her favourite toy, and time her.

It takes a village.

Don’t be afraid to lean on family and friends during this time. You may be a strong, independent woman, but even Wonder Woman has to count on the rest of the Justice League to bail her out every so often. So, let your mother take your baby for the morning, or take your friend up on that offer of babysitting for a few hours so that you can get some much-needed and well-deserved rest.

The post Sanity-saving parenting tips when you are sick appeared first on Living and Loving.


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