Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

43% of children have to be reminded to wash hands before eating says report

Poll of parents reveals worrying lack of understanding when it comes to hand washing A recent survey of 2,000 adults has concluded that “nearly two-fifths” of those with children needed to remind them to wash their hands after a toilet visit – a situation that seems to be exacerbated by the fact that many parents […]

Poll of parents reveals worrying lack of understanding when it comes to hand washing A recent survey of 2,000 adults has concluded that “nearly two-fifths” of those with children needed to remind them to wash their hands after a toilet visit – a situation that seems to be exacerbated by the fact that many parents […]

Poll of parents reveals worrying lack of understanding when it comes to hand washing

A recent survey of 2,000 adults has concluded that “nearly two-fifths” of those with children needed to remind them to wash their hands after a toilet visit – a situation that seems to be exacerbated by the fact that many parents are unsure of the basic requirements of effective hand hygiene, according to a recent report on The Sun website.

Hand washing habits amongst adults have certainly improved since the onset of coronavirus – both in terms of frequency and technique, and yet sixteen percents of adults who responded in the Royal Society for Public Health (RSPH) / Lifebuoy survey, “…worry they aren’t always setting the perfect example for their kids” wrote Astrid Hall.

Dr Ranj Singh is quoted as saying that even though the message has “sunk in with adults”, they are“unsure of the most important times to wash their hands.”  

“There is even more work to be done with children. Forming good habits when young is critical in helping to reduce the spread of infection – particularly as kids head back to school.”

More to be done regarding the teaching of hand washing

More than 80% of those surveyed parents are worried about the hygiene habits of their children as they return to school concluded their report. And nearly half expressed a concern that children would return home with germs.

Dr Singh is quoted as saying

“It’s great that hand-washing has been taken more seriously over the last few months as it’s been shown to be one of the most effective ways of preventing the spread of germs and bacteria.”

Nearly two-fifths of parents admit they struggle to get their kids to wash hands after toilet »


Handwashing teaching can be more effective with a songChildren being taught to wash their hands with a Teal portable sink

Teach children effective hand washing techniques with portable sinks that can go anywhere – indoors or out

The Kiddiwash range of warm water hand wash units are perfect for smaller hands – and are ideal where a portable solution is required.

Whether you require a larger wheeled unit such as the KiddiSynk, or the ultra portable Kiddiwash Xtra, you can ensure that all children in your care are able to wash their hands whether inside or out.


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