Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

Book Review: Becoming Mrs. Lewis by Patti Callahan

In Becoming Mrs. Lewis, author Patti Callahan, writes about the lives of Joy Davidman Gresham and C.S. Lewis. She uses available facts (letters, biographies, etc.) to tell the story of how their paths crossed and the deep love that followed. The novel begins with Joy in New York. She is a struggling writer who is married to an alcoholic with whom she has two sons. Joy experiences a divine moment in her son's nursery which she explains as the moment when God made himself known to her. She learns about C.S. Lewis, also known as Jack, and his own transformation...

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In Becoming Mrs. Lewis, author Patti Callahan, writes about the lives of Joy Davidman Gresham and C.S. Lewis. She uses available facts (letters, biographies, etc.) to tell the story of how their paths crossed and the deep love that followed. The novel begins with Joy in New York. She is a struggling writer who is married to an alcoholic with whom she has two sons. Joy experiences a divine moment in her son's nursery which she explains as the moment when God made himself known to her. She learns about C.S. Lewis, also known as Jack, and his own transformation...

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Favorite Quote: 

"A land fashioned of someone's fairy tale, " I murmured, out of breath as we reached the top. The sunlight settled on me with such warmth as I sat on the ground, my knees tented to rest my hands. "Yes," Warnie said. "It does seem so from here, does it not?" He took in a deep breath and bent over to clasp his knees. "But it's just plain ole Oxford."

"Oh Warnie!" I said, looking to him, his baggy cuffs puddling his feet as he leaned on his walking stick. "There is nothing plain about Oxford." 

"The eye of a newcomer," he said and straightened. "Let me look again." He squinted against the sun and leaned forward as if on the bow of a ship. "Yes, a fairy-tale land it is. You are very right, Mrs. Gresham." 

 Synopsis:

In Becoming Mrs. Lewis, author Patti Callahan, writes about the lives of Joy Davidman Gresham and C.S. Lewis. She uses available facts (letters, biographies, etc.) to tell the story of how their paths crossed and the deep love that followed. The novel begins with Joy in New York. She is a struggling writer who is married to an alcoholic with whom she has two sons. Joy experiences a divine moment in her son's nursery which she explains as the moment when God made himself known to her. She learns about C.S. Lewis, also known as Jack, and his own transformation from atheism to Christianity and writes him a letter looking for spiritual answers. A regular correspondence ensues and Joy begins to wait longingly for each letter traveling from Oxford (Jack's home). During this time, Joy finds herself in bad health with orders from her doctor to rest which eventually results in a trip to England to pursue better healthcare and time away from day to day responsibilities. This trip of a lifetime allows her to meet her dear friend and pen pal, Mr. Lewis, and their friendship continues to develop. 

My Thoughts: 

I listened to this novel during my own trip to England where I spent a week with a group of women visiting many literary related places in and around London. It was a beautiful time of rest and exploration and I know it made me love this book even more. Our group was able to tour C.S. Lewis' home, The Kilns, and some of the other spots in Oxford that were mentioned in the story. 

I knew just a little about Joy Davidman before reading this novel (because of some research I had done after reading A Grief Observed) and was enchanted by the the author's telling of their story. In the author's note, she makes it clear that she did as much research as possible in order to include a factual basis for the book, but that it is in fact a fictional retelling. I think expectations are key when reading books such as these and going into it knowing that it is a work of fiction is helpful. That said, I adored this book and it rekindled my love for C.S. Lewis and his works. Highly recommend for lovers of historical fiction and authors such as Kate Morton and Jojo Moyes. 


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