Hygiene plays a crucial component of a baby's overall care. Practicing a good hygiene is extremely important to keep your baby happy and healthy all the time.

Eight essential hygiene rules for your baby. Here are eight simple good hygiene practices to adopt when you have a baby.

  • Washing your hands with a good antibacterial soap is essential for removing harmful bacteria and germs that cause colds, flu, diarrhea and other infections. Be sure to dry your hands properly and wash your hand towels regularly. It's especially important to wash your hands before feeding your baby, after handling raw food, after changing a nappy or going to the toilet yourself, after touching pets, after touching anything dirty such as dirty nappies, rubbish or food waste.
  • You don't need to clean the house every day from top to bottom with disinfectant, you just need to pay particular attention to the surfaces that are most likely to harbour germs and bacteria. Focus on the areas that have a lot of contact with food, bodies and hands, such as bathrooms, kitchen benches, tables, crockery, cutlery and glassware. You need to be cleaning these properly. Use hot water with detergent for crockery, cutlery and glasses, while kitchens and bathrooms will need a thorough clean with a good disinfectant. Pay particular attention to taps, toilet seats, benches and door handles. Dry surfaces as well if they are not in a well-ventilated area with natural light.
  • Babies love to put things into their mouths, and toys are often the closest thing to hand. Be sure to regularly give your child's toys a clean with a good disinfectant. Wipe hard plastic toys down and make sure you rinse them thoroughly or put plush toys through the washing machine.
  • A good bath is essential for keeping your baby clean and tidy, but you need to make sure you are not over-washing as this is damaging to your baby's sensitive skin. In the first year of your baby's life a full bath is necessary only two or three times a week. Check out our step-by-step guide to bathing your baby.
  • These are three areas that need some special attention. Always keep your baby's nails well-trimmed so that they can't scratch themselves — the best time to trim them is when your baby is asleep. Be sure to use baby-sized nail clippers and not to cut the nails too short as these will hurt your baby.
  • Only wash the outside of your baby's ears, never the inside, and never insert cotton wool buds into your baby's ears. If your baby is unhappy and touching their ears repeatedly, this could be a sign of infection — be sure to get this looked at by a medical professional.
  • Clean any dried mucous from your baby's nose, as this can cause difficulty breathing. Use a damp wash cloth to gently remove the dried mucous. A nasal syringe may be needed to help remove excess mucous, but consult your baby's health practitioner before using one of these.
  • Be sure to keep your baby's eyes clear of any dried mucous. Use damp cotton wool to gently clean their eyes and seek medical attention if you notice your baby's eyes are irritated.

Parents share 7 important lessons they want to impart on their kids after the year that was 2020

Important lessons to teach kids

Gifts doesn’t always have to come wrapped in a box with a pretty bow – sometimes it can come in the form of a valuable life lesson…

The post Parents share 7 important lessons they want to impart on their kids after the year that was 2020 appeared first on Living and Loving written by Living And Loving Staff .


Important lessons to teach kids

Gifts doesn’t always have to come wrapped in a box with a pretty bow – sometimes it can come in the form of a valuable life lesson…

The post Parents share 7 important lessons they want to impart on their kids after the year that was 2020 appeared first on Living and Loving written by Living And Loving Staff .

Important lessons to teach kids

As we head towards the holiday season, gifting becomes something on our minds. What we’ve all been shown this year especially, is that people are what matter most, and not things.

With this in mind, which gifts can we give our little people that will serve them long after we’re gone?

Here are some lessons other parents mentioned that they wanted to impart to their children.

The ability to deal with change

2020 has shown us the unpredictability of the world. If it’s one trait we want to leave our kids with, it’s being able to be adaptable in an uncertain future. Beyond these skills though, we need to teach them that things do change and that’s okay – this acceptance of change is not a natural human trait, so our attitude in terms of how we approach change is vital. After all, our children will model themselves on us.

Acceptance of self

“Never be shy of your identity and love yourself,” says mom Nazreen Mohamed. The world needs all types of people and the ability to embrace your quirks, your unique personality, and your skills, is a valuable one. Most of all, it’s about happiness though – if we’re happy within ourselves, we will generally establish healthier relationships with others, something we all want for our kids.

Finding joy

Caroline Mackrill from Cape Town says she hopes that her children “can find joy in the everyday”. Whether it’s birdsong in the morning, the feel of warm sunshine on their skin, or the satisfaction of simply growing a plant from a seed, the secret to happiness lies in the small things, as well as the big. If we can find joy in everyday moments, we can live more mindfully, enjoying the present instead of focusing too much on past regrets, or a future we cannot control. And if finding joy seems like an impossible task on your own, there is always help. Fedhealth offers its members an Emotional Wellbeing Programme providing a dedicated call centre to help with trauma, personal coaching and more.

Kindness

We’ve all felt the value of kindness this year, as we’ve dealt with various challenges. The concept of kindness can be extended to empathy, the ability to imagine how others may feel and respond in a considerate way. Shanley Price Schaefer runs an emotional intelligence program for children called Heart Matters and she recommends using situations we experience in the world around us to start these conversations with our kids. “Whether it’s writing a card to a sick friend, or donating a sandwich to someone in need, life grants us many ways to model empathy – we just need to use them,” she says.

ALSO SEE: Photos of 3-year-old lending a helping hand to Ackermans staff goes viral

Resilience, perseverance and consistency

We all need resilience, but how do we cultivate this in our kids? The truth is that the fastest way to get stronger is to experience difficult situations. The hard part is that no parent likes to see their child unhappy, so we tend to shelter them from anything that challenges them. These could be small things, like not making a sports team, or harder things, like facing up a to a bully. But these are opportunities for growth and if we approach them by offering our children the tools to deal with them themselves, we’re helping build resilience.

Part of resilience is also consistency and perseverance – our children will not achieve their goals if they view failure as absolute, and a reason to quit. Marie Forlio was correct when she wrote that “Success doesn’t come from what we do occasionally, it comes from what we do consistently”.

Appreciate what you have

Lundi Alexander says the lesson she wants her kids to take away from this year is “To always value and appreciate all that you have. Love everyone but cherish those you are with as tomorow is not guarenteed.”

Kayleen Telemachus and Grace Paradza Tsodzo both agree with this. Life is a gift and you should appreciate what you have now they say.

Be flexible

Ruthann Sedgwick Amoore says the lesson she wants her kids to take away from this year is to be flexible. “Things don’t always have to go our way!” And this is so true – and a great lesson for everyone to take away from the chaotic year this has been. You have to adapt to your circumstances.

Roxanne Brockley adds that this year has also taught us and our kids to think outside the box – which is a great skill to have for everyone.

The post Parents share 7 important lessons they want to impart on their kids after the year that was 2020 appeared first on Living and Loving written by Living And Loving Staff .


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